Ganglions treatment, Geelong

Ganglion CystGanglions are swellings filled with a clear jelly which commonly occur around the wrist, in the palm of the hand or in the fingers. They usually form close to tendons or joints. Sometimes they are painful due to stretching of the surrounding tissues.

Types of Ganglions

Wrist ganglions

  • May occur on the front or back of the wrist.
  • More often occur in younger patients, although they may be seen in older patients with underlying arthritis.
  • May fluctuate in size and even spontaneously disappear.

Treatment

Nothing: These ganglions may rupture and disappear.

Aspiration: Involves placing a needle into the ganglion and sucking out the jelly. It can help relieve the discomfort. This might be performed under local anaesthetic in our rooms. The ganglion may not come back after aspiration though in  50 percent of patients it will recur. Aspiration may be repeated as many times as necessary.

Surgery: Aimed at removing the ganglion sack and the connection to the underlying joint. It may be performed under local anaesthetic or under sedation or general anaesthetic as a day case in hospital. Even after surgery, these ganglions may return.

Flexor sheath ganglions

  • Usually occur in the palm of the hand in the line of the fingers.
  • Usually related to the flexor tendons in the fingers.
  • Are often painful due to pressure when gripping objects.

Treatment

Nothing: These ganglions can rupture spontaneously.

Aspiration: A needle is placed into the ganglion to rupture it, although it is important to note that the ganglion may still recur. This procedure may be performed under local anaesthetic in our rooms.

Surgery: Removes the ganglion via a zig-zag incision in the finger. A small window of tendon sheath is removed in order to prevent the ganglion returning. Surgery may be performed under local anaesthetic or under sedation as a day case in hospital.

Mucous cyst

  • Occurs over the end joint on the finger or thumb.
  • Usually develops in the setting of arthritis in this end joint.

Treatment

Nothing: Occasionally these ganglions disappear spontaneously.

Aspiration: These ganglions frequently recur after aspiration.

Surgery: Involves excising the ganglion via a straight line incision over the back of the finger. Bony spurs around the joint are removed in order to prevent recurrence. The surgery may be performed under local anaesthetic in the rooms of Andrew McDonald Plastic Surgeon, or under sedation as a day case in hospital. If you have any queries about ganglions, or any other condition of the hand such as arthritis, trigger finger or Dupuytren’s disease, please do not hesitate to contact us.